PolyVagal ~ Adapting to social distancing

~ Developing relational intricacies
~ Resources for communications

Please click for a PDF file to view, print, or download
Jan Winhall’s charts Felt Sense Polyvagal Model of Emotional Regulation

FSPM_Clinician-Model-ER Jan Winhall ©2019 PDF

FSPM_Client Model ER Jan Winhall ©2019 PDF

9-minute video conversation Serge Prengel with Stephen Porges, developer of the Polyvagal Theory, about countering the effects of social distancing: https://relationalimplicit.com/porges-social/

Also on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6FGTHm6R4pc&list=PLT6ApC3q1w9GMlCWMdu3qSGapSjd-6kxx

Stephen Porges: Dealing with social distancing. Relational Implicit, March 2020
Below is copy of the transcript
[Keywords and Emphasis added by Katarina Halm]
KEYWORDS
ENGAGE
PARADOX
TRUE PRIORITIES
OPPORTUNITIES
MONITOR
CO-REGULATE, SETTLING, GROUNDING.
SYNTAX
MEANING
SYMBOLS.
MODIFY

Stephen Porges: Dealing with social distancing Relational Implicit March 2020 Stephen W. Porges, Ph.D., is Distinguished University Scientist at Indiana University, where he directs the Trauma Research Center within the Kinsey Institute. He holds the position of Professor of Psychiatry at the University of North Carolina and Professor Emeritus at the University of Illinois at Chicago and the University of Maryland. He served as president of both the Society for Psychophysiological Research and the Federation of Associations in Behavioral & Brain Sciences and is a former recipient of a National Institute of Mental Health Research Scientist Development Award. He has published more than 250 peer-reviewed scientific papers across several disciplines including anesthesiology, critical care medicine, ergonomics, exercise physiology, gerontology, neurology, obstetrics, pediatrics, psychiatry, psychology, space medicine, and substance abuse. In 1994 he proposed the Polyvagal Theory, a theory that links the evolution of the mammalian autonomic nervous system to social behavior and emphasizes the importance of physiological state in the expression of behavioral problems and psychiatric disorders.

Serge Prengel, LMHC is the editor the Relational Implicit project (http://relationalimplicit.com).

Social distancing and separation are a big part of what is needed to deal with the pandemic. In this short conversation, we talk about how to counter their effects: we still need to be sensitive to our nervous system’s need to socially engage and connect.

Serge Prengel (00:00): These are really difficult times.

Stephen Porges (00:03): They certainly are. And there’s an irony going on because we have to avoid becoming infected. There’s no question that the Coronavirus is a health risk, especially to those of us who are more mature. It is real. The question is related to the way that we need to behave to reduce that risk through social isolation. And this strategy creates an amazing PARADOX for our nervous system and our needs to interact with other people because, as humans we have a powerful need is to connect and to CO-REGULATE with others, but now we’re being told that this is not the right thing to do. There are priorities and the top priority is not to get infected, but there’s also a priority of understanding the needs of our nervous system…

Serge Prengel (00:51): So, this is a counterintuitive situation where we cannot trust our instinct, evolutionary instinct, because we have to do something different. Not from coercion, but actually from understanding that social isolation is required at this point.

Page 2

Stephen Porges (01:08): I think that is a really concise way of explaining the PARADOX through which our nervous system is trying to navigate. And that is, we need to socially isolate. However, our nervous system says, Hey, that’s not the way we evolved, not the way we need to be. We need to co-regulate, so we need to be smart.

(01:31): Now we need to know what the TRUE PRIORITIES are. And the top priority of course, is to stay alive. But how can we mitigate that nervous system’s demand, request, and passion, to connect? And we have to find ways to connect! We have to do that through telephone and through video chat. They are really reasonably good, and email is okay, but the value of hearing someone’s voice or seeing someone’s face is a powerful reassuring cue of safety to our nervous system. So we have to reach out. It’s been remarkable over the past few days, because the world turned from a social to an isolated world within in a week.

(02:09): A week ago, I was in New York city, it was elbow to elbow. I was talking at a crowded conference. And my comment was, I’ll give people hugs. I’ll shake their hands this month, but next month I will do something different. And within a few days, the world changed. And we realized that it wasn’t a fear of a virus that was really distal in time. It was here. We need to really take care of ourselves and to really MONITOR our bodies’ need to connect, to give others a hug, to smile, to be reassuring, to touch them on their shoulders or on their hands, to let them know that we’re here to support them and be with them. What I’ve noticed over the past few days is my very close friends have reached out through video conferencing, through phone calls, just to connect. It’s really a beautiful moment when people are reaching out to say, I’M HERE. HOW ARE YOU? What can I do for you?

Serge Prengel (03:14): Yeah. So, we don’t kill that impulse to connect . We channel it, and savor it as we find ways to do it through voice and sight – – phone and videoconferencing.

Stephen Porges (03:34): Yes. We MODIFY because we are a relatively intelligent species (at times we are not so sure about that). We are reading our bodily feelings. And our bodily feelings want to be held, want to be embraced, want to be safe with the people whom we trust. That’s basically a neural circuit that’s reaching out. We’re really saying to that neural circuit: We can’t do that now.

(03:59): If we don’t ENGAGE people for a period of time, we go into another state. That is, we become marginalized and we start to become too isolated. And this is really very, very bad for our nervous system. And our body will react to that with a bias of negativity. This is the other issue. As we separate, the notions of being overly concerned, or neurotic, or paranoid about the situation will increase because we are not getting sufficient OPPORTUNITIES to CO-REGULATE.

(04:32): So, being smart, we need to reach out and use the tools that we have. The internet is a useful tool. Through videoconferencing, we can talk, we can hear each other’s voices and we can feel connected. Again, it’s not equivalent to being in the room with a person, but it’s a lot better than not having any contact.

Serge Prengel (04:54): 3 Then, when we connect, when we communicate this way, there is an intentionality that the communication is not just about the content. The communication is about co-regulating. It Is about that sense of connection that we crave.

Stephen Porges (05:15): Absolutely. Because it’s not the words, it’s the intentionality of feelings that we’re communicating with each other. We’re creating a capacity CO-REGULATE each other’s physiological and emotional and behavioral state. As we CO-REGULATE each other, we feel SAGER in the SPACE and TIME that we’re in. We become more generous to others, more welcoming and more accessible.

(05:41): As we isolate, the separated bodies and nervous systems, become more defensive. The nervous system literally supports these feelings of isolation and defensiveness. So we have to be smart. We have to retailor or reframe what isolation is. In this situation. It’s a defense, but we don’t want it to blend or bleed into becoming defensive of our interactions with others. And so we need to really reach out and use the tools that are available to us and ENGAGE others. Use our voices, use our facial expressions, with VIDEO chatting.

(06:22): It’s a lot better than texting. The issue of texting and email is that you’re stripping the voice and the face from the words. Our nervous systems evolved to detect the intonation. I’s only through long a long period of evolution that our nervous system was able to create language, to create SYNTAX and to extract MEANING from SYMBOLS. So we want to relate to each other on a very… almost a primitive level. And that is facial expressivity and intonation of voice. We have the telephone for the voice and we have video chatting for voice and facial expressions.

Serge Prengel (07:01): And so, maybe, we can even go one step further than simply chatting on the phone or videoconferencing. As we are in communication, we consciously pay attention to what’s happening in our body. And communicate with each other that what we’re doing is not just exchanging content, exchanging news, but the PROCESS of co-regulating itself. For instance, as we talk, I am feeling my energy coming down a bit. I’m feeling more SETTLING, a sense of SETTLING and GROUNDING…

Stephen Porges (07:44): You’re feeling connectedness. And what you’re really emphasizing is that it’s not a show-and-tell. It’s a co-regulation. And we have terms that we use: mirroring, attuning, or synchrony. But really it’s all about co-regulating. And what you were emphasizing was to acknowledge one’s own feelings. I would go a step further. That is, to MONITOR and acknowledge the feelings of the one that you’re talking to. So you’re reaching literally into their sphere, their consciousness, their nervous system. And you’re really saying: I’m present. I’m here with you.

Serge Prengel (08:23): Yeah. So that’s a very good step. We’re talking about reaching out. Reaching in and reaching out. Reaching inside, reaching out to the other person. MONITORING myself, MONITORING each other. Having a sense of this is what connection is about. This is what we’re experiencing as we’re connecting. Stephen Porges (08:44): Yes. I think that’s a very good summary of the message.

Serge Prengel (08:49): 4 Thanks, Steve.

Stephen Porges (08:50): Oh, you’re quite welcome. Serge. It’s good to connect during this time with you. Thank you.

© 2020. All rights reserved. Relational Implicit and its web address (relationalimplicit.com) should be properly cited when these contents are used in any form.

Feldenkrais® & the Vagus System: Elinor Silverstein & Anastasi Siotas
Additional notes to follow.

Meanwhile here is the link to an informative and practical presentation from Elinor Silverstein “We led a lovely impromptu online 1-hour class for Feldenkrais® members about the Vagus System and what we can do to help ourselves and others. Here is the video of all of us together and to so many more who were not able to attend but would like to see it and learn. This is for everyone, you don’t need to be a Feldenkrais Practitioner®.”

https://onstickytopics.com/vagusfpaw/

The Felt Sense/Polyvagal Model by Jan Winhall
… additional notes to follow in this spot

Felt Sense Experience Model of Emotional Regulation (Webinar)
by Jan Winhall https://www.focusingonborden.com/model

“In a series presented by The International Focusing Institute, this two-hour workshop (presented by Jan Winhall), explores how stress and traumatic experience prevents and/ or disrupts our capacity to be grounded. Jan presents material from her chapter in Emerging Practice In Focusing-Oriented Psychotherapy and guides viewers through various experiential exercises.

If you would like access to this webinar, we ask you make a small donation to The International Focusing Institute [https://focusing.org/civicrm/contribute/transact?reset=1…] . Please specify this donation for “Jan Winhalls Webinar,” and a password will be sent to you by email. ”

Jan Winhall MSW RSW
www.focusingonborden.com
Adjunct Lecturer
Faculty of Social Work
University of Toronto

‘Fight/Flight and Freeze’ a helpful perspective from Violet van Hees
… additional notes to follow

Meanwhile from Violet van Hees February 2019 presentation:

Webinar Slides

www.violetvanhees.com
250-327-4751 (cell)
violet@violetvanhees.com

“Create Movement Freedom, and Open Your World!”

Astrid Schillings Dwelling in the Process of Embodied Awareness: Letting Fresh Life Come Through Whole Body Focusing Therapy

Page 290 https://www.jkp.com/uk/emerging-practice-in-focusing-oriented-psychotherapy-2.html/ Focusing-Oriented Psychotherapy, Greg Madison (Ed.) Jessica Kingsley Publications Emerging Practice in Focusing-Oriented Psychotherapy. Innovative Theory and Applications Theory and Practice of Focusing-Oriented Psychotherapy. Beyond the Talking Cure

CHAPTER 5 page 81
Astrid Schillings Dwelling in the Process of Embodied Awareness: Letting Fresh Life Come Through Whole Body Focusing Therapy
included at the preview link https://www.jkp.com/uk/emerging-practice-in-focusing-oriented-psychotherapy-2.html/

Focusing-Oriented Psychotherapy, Greg Madison (Ed.) Jessica Kingsley Publications
Emerging Practice in Focusing-Oriented Psychotherapy. Innovative Theory and Applications
Theory and Practice of Focusing-Oriented Psychotherapy. Beyond the Talking Cure

Contributions by: Leslie Ellis, Kenichi Itoh, Susanne Vahrenkamp, Shirley Turcotte, Joan Lavender, Isabel Gascon, Joan Klagsbrun, Doralee Grindler Katonah, Eunsun Joo, Mary K. Armstrong, Glenn Fleisch, Astrid Schillings, Salvador Moreno López, Mako Hikasa, Bernadette Lamboy, Emmanuil Vantarakis, Karen Whalen, Mia Leijssen, Catherine Garnett, Heinz-Joachim Feuerstein, Jan Winhall, Jeffrey J. Schiffer, Kevin McEvenue Foreword by: Mary Hendricks Gendlin Edited by: Greg Madison

Included is a preview of some chapters https://www.jkp.com/uk/emerging-practice-in-focusing-oriented-psychotherapy-2.html/

Porges, S. W. (2020). The COVID-19 Pandemic is a paradoxical challenge to our nervous system, a Polyvagal Perspective. Clinical Neuropsychiatry, 17(2),135-138./ list of section titles and quotes

PDF Porges, S. W. (2020). The COVID-19 Pandemic is a paradoxical challenge to our nervous system, a Polyvagal Perspective. Clinical Neuropsychiatry, 17(2),135-138. (list of section titles)

RTF Porges, S. W. (2020). The COVID-19 Pandemic is a paradoxical challenge to our nervous system, a Polyvagal Perspective. Clinical Neuropsychiatry, 17(2),135-138. (list of section titles)

Below is a List of Section titles and Track names of an informal reading of the article:

Porges, S. W. (2020). The COVID-19 Pandemic is a paradoxical challenge to our nervous system, a Polyvagal Perspective. Clinical Neuropsychiatry, 17(2),135-138.

with appreciation to Jenn Wesanko for sending us the article.

1/Abstract and credits. page 135

2/ The Pandemic impacts on our biological

imperative to connect. page 135

3/A one nervous system model heightens

awareness of bidirectional brain-body

communication . page 135

4/A Polyvagal Perspective. page 136

5/Public health strategies compound feelings of

threat. page 136

6/ Mitigating threat responses through

videoconferencing page 137

7/ Conceptualizing autonomic state as an intervening

variable enhances the understanding of

risk and optimizes treatment  page 137

8/ References pages 137-8

* Cabrera, A., Kolacz, J., Pailhez, G., Bulbena‐Cabre, A.,

* Bulbena, A., & Porges, S. W. (2018). Assessing body

awareness and autonomic reactivity: Factor structure

and psychometric properties of the Body Perception

* Questionnaire‐Short Form (BPQ‐SF). International

journal of methods in psychiatric research, 27(2), e1596.

* Dobzhansky, T. (1962). Mankind evolving (pp. 150-152).

New Haven: Yale University Press.

* Dobzhansky, T. (1973). Nothing in biology makes sense

except in the light of evolution. The american biology

teacher, 35(3), 125-129.

* Hess, W. R. (1949). Nobel lecture. Nobel Lectures, Physiology

or Medicine (1942-1962).

* Jackson, J. H. (1884). The Croonian lectures on evolution

and dissolution of the nervous system. British medical

journal, 1(1215), 703.

* Kolacz J., Dale L., Nix E., Lewis G. F., & Porges S. W.

(unpublished). Trauma history predicts self-reported

autonomic reactivity and psychological wellbeing during

the COVID-19 pandemic.

* Porges, S. (1993). Body perception questionnaire. Laboratory

of Developmental Assessment, University of Maryland.

* Porges, S. W. (1995). Orienting in a defensive world:

Mammalian modifications of our evolutionary heritage. A

polyvagal theory. Psychophysiology, 32(4), 301-318.

* Porges, S. W. (2003). Social engagement and attachment:

a phylogenetic perspective. Annals of the New York

Academy of Sciences, 1008(1), 31-47.

* Porges, S. W. (2004). Neuroception: A subconscious system

for detecting threats and safety. Zero to Three (J), 24(5),

19-24.

* Porges, S. W. (2007). The polyvagal perspective. Biological

psychology, 74(2), 116-143.

* Porges, S. W. (2009). The polyvagal theory: new insights

into adaptive reactions of the autonomic nervous system.

Cleveland Clinic journal of medicine, 76(Suppl 2), S86.

What Doctors on the Front Lines Wish They’d Known a Month Ago – The N…>

Article by Jim Dwyer, April 14, 2020 (with appreciation to Doug Bolston for sending us the article)

Also noted at the top of the article:

“Doctors say the coronavirus is challenging core tenets of medicine, leading some to abandon long-established ventilator protocols for certain patients. But other doctors warn this could be dangerous.” Credit…Sarah Blesener for The New York Times

Virtual space as an evolutionary opportunity – Thomas Hübl

Article “Virtual Relationships”

Learning more about the current virus

~ Studies towards a vaccine
~ Resources for practical safety
~ Understanding current situations

Noting from Peter Kolchinsky March 2020

Peter Kolchinsky Mar 24, 2020

Here’s something I once learned in virology school that should make you feel a bit better about why, unlike the flu, #COVID19 most likely won’t be able to mutate to escape the vaccines we’re developing. It has to do with the fact that COVID-19’s genome is made up of…

_____________________________
Replying to @PeterKolchinsky
Can you comment on the likelihood of a mutation and catching a different strain?

Peter Kolchinsky Mar 28, 2020
Link to this tweet:
https://twitter.com/PeterKolchinsky/status/1244126280053936129

talk of mutation is overblown. This comes up often. Flu mutates like a vine grows… coronaviruses mutate like a cactus grows. You can see a cactus grow if you look closely, but it’s still v. slow & our immune systems & vaccines will keep up easily… after this 1st bad exposure.
_____________________________

Link to the thread started by this tweet:
https://twitter.com/PeterKolchinsky/status/1244029896453754880
If you are hearing about #covid19 “reinfections” in Asia, I can offer you my take as a virologist. The best explanation for what we’re seeing is likely due to three things..

[A later tweet in this thread]
The main reason I’m skeptical that patients were actually reinfected so soon after recovering is due to what we know of the virus and recovery. Patients who beat their infection (and ~98-99% do), do so because their immune systems rev up enough to beat it.

[followed by]
And covid is barely mutating the parts that the immune system recognizes (the spike protein), so once a patient beats their high level of virus, they would easily be able to beat back whatever little virus they might get exposed to from others.
__________________________
[PK Answering this question: Could you respond to some question and fear of whether SARS-CoV-2 can behave like HSV and Herpes zoster virus becoming dormant inside the afflicted body cells and reactivate in some point in future]

Peter Kolchinsky Mar 29, 2020
Coronaviruses can’t lie dormant for long. Genomes are transient RNA (not sturdy DNA), & not being a retrovirus, they must replicate or die. They are like software that gets wiped when computer is shut off… they don’t reside on hard drives (like HIV, herpes, and hepatitis B do).

Go to cbc.ca and then scroll down the radio page till you get to Podcasts near the bottom and click on that.  In there you can then scroll down to Monday April 13th, 2020 and find the first story with Prof. William Ristenpart of Chemical Engineering at UC Davis.
While masks will stop the cough or sneeze particles at 30 microns, they are generally ineffective against the normal speech produced particles which measure only one micron and can float around much further and longer in closed spaces because they are aerosolized.  In these situations two meters offers little protection.

Noting from Neil Dunaetz March 2020: “This recent article by Zeynep Tufekci at defenseone.com critiques the early response by the United States to the coronavirus pandemic in terms of the KIND OF THINKING that was–and was not–being applied.
https://www.defenseone.com/ideas/2020/03/it-wasnt-just-trump-who-got-it-wrong/164186/
Instead of thinking in terms of whole complex systems, it argues, we have made the reductionist error of treating abstract comparative terms as themselves real things, thus missing actual interactional complexity.

The sad result being that we failed to conceive what we were really up against. (And, imo, we continue to not grasp it well.)
Please notice especially, in the fourth paragraph from the end,

“…tight coupling between the components. Tight coupling means that every part of the system moves together, which in turn means that even small things can cause a crisis—for want of a nail.”
What the concept “tight coupling” tries to say is, imo, FUNCTIONALLY-CLOSE to what Gendlin means by “interaction first” and “sequences of whole events.”
By “functionally-close” I mean the two concepts are not equivalent as concepts. “Tight coupling” assumes individuated factors as prior and basic, and Gendlin’s model does not. But each of these very different ways of conceiving tries to speak from and about complex events in a way that strongly does not drop out emergent interactional complexity.”

Noting that Estrellita Gonzalez now has an online store for masks, several colours: https://www.myskinsalon.com/collections/face-mask “This will have both taxes added but should show free delivery within Vancouver but shipping charges apply outside of Vancouver (with free shipping on orders over $75 anywhere else)”.  Many of you may know Estrellita from her work for the Vancouger School Board. 

With appreciation to Sera Kirk: how to fold your own with a piece of cloth and two elastics.    illustrated graphics at wikiHow instructions: https://www.wikihow.com/Make-a-%22No-Sew%22-Face-Mask 

Also noting with appreciation to Sera Kirk: a   6-minute video featuring physician Dr. Jonah Sharma, who explains, in clear and simple terms, how Covid-19 spreads and why wearing a mask helps prevent that spread: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pesxqQkGBC4 .
…  ” online found that pacific cloth has silver and zinc impregnated into it but I don’t know if it’s in a form that can be breathed through by humans.
I truly believe that everyone who has a mask, should wear it in public places such as grocery stores.”
 
 
Below is a compilation of Corona Virus INFO from a colleague:
 
silver embedded fabric sources + 
 
halyard cloth. used and it is N-99.     Halyard 600
 
InterDry Moisture Wicking Fabric with Antimicrobial Silver
Also Source For Nitrile Gloves

They Have A Wide Variety Of Silver Embedded Fabrics.  You Might Have To Back Order Some Types Of Fabric.  I Back Ordered And Waited 1 Week Before They Restocked.
 
sources for face mask patterns.
INFORMATION about mask patterns:
3. Some guidance: Use 100% cotton; wash material on hot before use; package with gloves (or very well-scrubbed hands); package in well-sealed bags.
5. WeNeedMasks.org: Janice Blasko of the American Sewing Guild and the Sewing and Craft Alliance rapidly developed this U.S.-based website. It includes a mask-making tutorial, and it provides a platform for healthcare organizations to register their needs and requirements.
6. Open-source COVID19 medical supplies guidelines: This Google document offers sage advice, a step-by-step model, and links for finding and connecting with local organizations in need. It stresses the importance of not overwhelming facilities with questions about donations. It is a live document, with time-stamped revisions. Open-Source COVID19 Medical Supplies is also an open group on Facebook.
7.  Olson mask for healthcare providers tutorial video: This 18-minute video tutorial is presented by UnityPoint Health professionals at St. Luke’s hospital in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. They advocate the Olson mask for personal use, and possibly for healthcare use if needed and requested. 
8.  Another Olson mask tutorial for personal use was created by a technical fashion designer and includes process steps, links to a detailed pattern, and links to more information and other tutorial sources.
9.  Do an internet search for “no-sew patterns.  There is another pattern floating around that is “no sew” and uses paper towels+staples etc.
 
10: <https://makermask.org/materials/>. very good site 3 types of masks
 
 
12;  You tube no sew mask instructions:  
 
13….
 
14.  Very important the information in the video in the link
 
 
 
 
INFORMATION RESOURCES:
Subject: Most extraordinary video on virus: Weill Cornell Medical Center ICU doctor tells it like it is
 
Check out the new Rosie the Mask Maker!!
 
Great information from a colleague. Permission given to share.
Shared from Margie Setterloff, with her permission:
The following is from Irene Ken, a physician whose daughter is an Asst. Prof in infectious diseases at Johns Hopkins University. I believe you will find it to be quite informative.
* The virus is not a living organism, but a protein molecule (DNA) covered by a protective layer of lipid (fat), which, when absorbed by the cells of the ocular, nasal or buccal mucosa, changes the genetic code of the cells (mutation) and converts them into aggressor and multiplier cells.
* Since the virus is not a living organism but a protein molecule, it is not killed, but decays on its own. The disintegration time depends on the temperature, humidity and type of material where it lies.
* The virus is very fragile; The only thing that protects it is a thin outer layer of fat. That is why any soap or detergent is the best remedy because the foam CUTS the FAT (which is why you have to rub so much: for 20 seconds or more, to make a lot of foam when washing your hands). By dissolving the fat layer, the protein molecule disperses and breaks down on its own.
* HEAT melts fat; This is why it is so good to use water above 25 degrees Celsius for washing hands, clothes and everything. Additionally, hot water makes more foam and that makes it even more useful.
* Alcohol or any mixture with alcohol over 65% DISSOLVES ANY FAT, especially the external lipid layer of the virus.
* Any mix with 1 part bleach and 5 parts water directly dissolves the protein, breaks it down from the inside.
* Oxygenated water helps long after soap, alcohol and chlorine because peroxide dissolves the virus protein, but you have to use it pure and it hurts your skin.
* NO BACTERICIDE OR ANTIBIOTIC SERVES TO KILL THE VIRUS! Viruses are not a living organisms like bacteria; Antibodies cannot kill what is not alive. 
* NEVER shake used or unused clothing, sheets or cloth. While glued to a porous surface, a virus is very inert and disintegrates at different rates depending on the surface:
-between 3 hours (fabric and porous), 
-4 hours (copper and wood)
-24 hours (cardboard), 
– 42 hours (metal) and 
-72 hours (plastic). 
But if you shake it or use a feather duster, the virus molecules float in the air for up to 3 hours, and can lodge in your nose.
* The virus molecules remain very stable in external cold, or artificial as air conditioners in houses and cars. 
* Viruses also need moisture and especially darkness to stay stable;Therefore, dehumidified, dry, warm and bright environments will degrade them faster.
* UV LIGHT on any object that may contain a virus breaks down the virus’ protein, thereby disinfecting the surface. Be careful, as it also breaks down collagen (which is protein) in the skin.
* The virus CANNOT go through healthy skin.
* Vinegar is NOT useful because it does not break down the protective layer of fat.
* NO SPIRITS, NOR VODKA, serve as disinfectants against viruses. The strongest vodka is 40% alcohol, and you need 65%.
* LISTERINE can work as It is 65% alcohol.
* The more confined the space, the more concentration of the virus there can be. The more open or naturally ventilated, the less.
* You have to wash your hands before and after touching mucosa, food, locks, knobs, switches, remote control, cell phone, watches, computers, desks, TV, etc. And, of course, when using the bathroom.
* You have to moisturize dry hands from so much washing, because the molecules can hide in the micro cracks. The thicker the moisturizer, the better. 
* Also keep your NAILS SHORT so that the virus does not hide there.
-JOHNS HOPKINS HOSPITAL
*REPOST*

6-minute video featuring physician Dr. Jonah Sharma, who explains, in clear and simple terms, how Covid-19 spreads and why wearing a mask helps prevent that spread: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pesxqQkGBC4

Dr Tippett: “I am an Internal Medicine-certified, Emergency Room MD with a PhD in Biochemistry. I have also spent much of my professional life in the high-tech world helping people understand how risk, infection, and the growth of infection behaves.  So I thought it might be helpful to folks in my network to explain how personal protection from a virus like SARS-CoV-2 (the formal name of the virus that causes COVID-19) actually works, how any given measure individually lowers risk, how various countermeasures work together, and most importantly, to give you some simple guidelines for day-to-day living in this new COVID world.  ”

https://caremesh.com/blog/2020/4/8/saving-your-health-one-mask-at-a-time

Article on respiratory viruses (posted 200428):
Stay well
4 replies
  1. happybones
    happybones says:

    “‘the fittest may also be the gentlest, because
    survival often requires mutual help and cooperation’
    (Dobzhansky, 1962). According to Dobzhansky, it
    is this capacity to cooperate that enabled the earliest
    mammalian species to survive in a hostile world
    dominated by physically larger and potentially
    aggressive reptiles. Although unaware of Dobzhansky’s
    major contributions, the publication that introduced
    Polyvagal Theory was titled “Orienting in a defensive
    world: Mammalian modifications of our evolutionary
    heritage. A Polyvagal Theory” (Porges, 1995). In
    retrospect, the title was a tribute to Dobzhansky’s
    insightful statement that “nothing in biology makes
    sense except in the light of evolution” (Dobzhansky,
    1973).”
    –– Stephen W. Porges, page 135 in Porges, S. W. (2020). The COVID-19 Pandemic is a paradoxical challenge to our nervous system, a Polyvagal Perspective. Clinical Neuropsychiatry, 17(2),135-138.

    Reply
  2. happybones
    happybones says:

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Below is a List of Tracks for an informal reading of the article:
    Porges, S. W. (2020). The COVID-19 Pandemic is a paradoxical challenge to our nervous system, a Polyvagal Perspective. Clinical Neuropsychiatry, 17(2),135-138.
    with appreciation to Jenn Wesanko for sending us the article.

    1/Abstract and credits. page 135

    2/ The Pandemic impacts on our biological
    imperative to connect. page 135

    3/A one nervous system model heightens
    awareness of bidirectional brain-body
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    6/ Mitigating threat responses through
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    7/ Conceptualizing autonomic state as an intervening
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    8/ References pages 137-8
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  3. happybones
    happybones says:

    “you can also increase the flow of oxygen to your lungs by not resting on your back” with appreciation to Doug Bolston for sending us the excerpt from https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/30/well/live/coronavirus-days-5-through-10.html

    [excerpt]:

    While every patient is different, doctors say that days five through 10 of the illness are often the most worrisome time for respiratory complications of Covid-19, particularly for older patients and those with underlying conditions like high blood pressure, obesity or diabetes. Younger patients who develop complications may begin struggling a little later, as late as days 10 to 12. Most people who reach day 14 without any worrying symptoms (other than feeling miserable and fatigued) are likely to be on the road to recovery.

    The best way to monitor your health during this time is to use a pulse oximeter, a small device that clips on your finger and measures your blood oxygen levels. (There are phone-based apps meant to do this, but they have tested poorly) The normal oxygen saturation range is about 96 to 99 percent. If your blood oxygen reading drops to 92 percent, it’s time to call a doctor.

    While at home, you can also increase the flow of oxygen to your lungs by not resting on your back. Resting on your stomach, in the prone position, can open parts of the lungs that are compressed when lying on your back. You can also change to resting on your left side or right side, or sit upright in a chair.

    Reply

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